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The report explores the attitudes, values, social behaviors, family characteristics, economic well-being, educational attainment and labor force outcomes of these young Latinos.

It is based on a new Pew Hispanic Center telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,012 Latinos, supplemented by the Center’s analysis of government demographic, economic, education and health data sets. Young Latinos are satisfied with their lives, optimistic about their futures and place a high value on education, hard work and career success.

As such, the report can provide some insights into the intergenerational mobility of an immigrant group over time.

But whatever the ultimate trajectory, it is clear that many of today’s Latino youths, be they first or second generation, are straddling two worlds as they adapt to the new homeland.

According to the Pew Hispanic Center’s National Survey of Latinos, more than half (52%) of Latinos ages 16 to 25 identify themselves first by their family’s country of origin, be it Mexico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador or any of more than a dozen other Spanish-speaking countries.

S.-born children of immigrants) and third and higher generation (U.

S.-born grandchildren or more far-removed descendants of immigrants).

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